Friday, 22nd of March

EMN study “Beneficiaries of international protection travelling to their country of origin: challenges, policies and practices”

The purpose of the study “Beneficiaries of international protection travelling to their country of origin: challenges, policies and practices” is to gather information available in the Member States, which may indicate the reasons for the beneficiaries of international protection to emigrate or seek to establish links with the country of origin. Both the Geneva Convention on the Status of Refugees and the European Union’s Asylum legislation determine reasons for the termination of the international protection. In circumstances where the apparently international protection is no longer necessary or is not justified, the competent authorities are entitled to decide on the cessation of the status in the context of the study. Receiving a national passport or frequent travelling to the country of origin in certain circumstances may indicate that a person no longer needs international protection status. Similarly, such actions may indicate that the beneficiary of international protection wishes to re-establish ties and settle in the country of origin. Thus, the study also analyses the possible consequences of the activities of the competent authorities, which would relate to the international protection of the person and his rights of residence.

Over the recent years, the competent institutions of the European Union Member States have, observed an increasing interest amongst beneficiaries of international protection regarding their country of origin, in the form of applying for a passport in a representation office of the country of origin or by traveling to their country of origin. Although such activities do not mean the automatic cessation of refugee status or subsidiary protection status, under certain circumstances, these activities may provide the basis for the competent authorities to reassess the reasons on which the person was granted international protection. For example, a person’s justified fear of persecution in the country of origin or the possibility of a person suffering serious harm.